Restorative Practice & Principles

Emmaus Hull & East Riding has adopted Restorative approaches as an organisational framework. The fundamental value of working WITH companions and organisational staff throughout their Emmaus journey.

Restorative practice is a term used to describe a way of being, an underpinning ethos, which enables us to build and maintain healthy relationships, resolve difficulties and repair harm when relationships breakdown.

When harm has been caused by inappropriate, sometimes thoughtless, negative behaviour then all sides need:

  • a chance to tell their side of the story and feel heard
  • to understand better how the situation happened
  • to understand how it can be avoided another time
  • to feel understood by the others involved
  • to find a way to move on and feel better about themselves

If conflicts and challenges are dealt with in a way that get these needs met then those involved can repair the damage done to their connections with the others involved, or even build connections where there were none previously. They feel fairly treated and respected, since they have been trusted to find solutions for themselves and put things right in their own way. Because they have been listened to, people in conflict are more ready to listen to others’ perspectives and emotional responses, and so empathy is developed. This can change the choices made in future situations, as mutual respect and consideration develop.

 

If conflicts and challenges are dealt with in a way that get these needs met then those involved can repair the damage done to their connections with the others involved, or even build connections where there were none previously. They feel fairly treated and respected, since they have been trusted to find solutions for themselves and put things right in their own way. Because they have been listened to, people in conflict are more ready to listen to others’ perspectives and emotional responses, and so empathy is developed. This can change the choices made in future situations, as mutual respect and consideration develop.

Emmaus Hull & East Riding use Circles, Restorative Language, Restorative Principles, and Facilitating Skills throughout all of its services.

Companion Involvement

Companions will be involved in day to day operations at every level within Emmaus Hull & East Riding, including key decision making processes. Community inclusion will take many forms and the basis of this will be:

  • Companion meetings (Circles)
  • Companions Suggestion Scheme
  • Companion led recognition and rewards
  • Companion Policy Shaping & Review Processes
  • Transparency around how Companion related funds are used
  • Companions supporting business growth and direction
  • Planned social events for Companions
  • Companion led Community events
  • Staff Recruitment
  • Surveys and monitoring
  • Companion led services
  • Companion led strategy groups

Three core components of Fair Process:

1 – Engagement: Involving individuals in decisions that affect them by asking for their input and allowing them to refute the merit of one another’s ideas.

2 – Explanation: Everyone involved and affected should understand why final decisions are made as they are. Creates powerful feedback loop that enhances learning.

3 – Expectation Clarity: Once decisions are made, new expectations are clearly stated so that everyone understands their role and what is expected of them.

Emmaus Hull & ER will train its staff, volunteers, and companions in the following areas:

  • Restorative Practice & Principles
  • Use of Circles
  • Facilitating Restorative processes